I'm Roland, lucky human being and #everydaygreenie. 

I like to go on adventures, learn new things, take photos with my camera and make stuff with my hands. 
I get excited a lot.

Mainly I'm excited because I'm on a journey, to prove that sustainable living is not only important, but really achievable.

Find out more about this blog and why I'm on the internet here.

Getting Mad Lit

Getting Mad Lit

Oi for serious though, is the word queer still allowed to be said online without a social justice war erupting? No? Oh. Sorry. Bugger. Anyway, I’ve been making soy candles recently, and regardless of the impact that such an activity may have on my perceived sexuality, I'm fkn enjoying it heaps. They smell insane - insane enough to change my mood! Doesn’t that blow your mind? It blows mine, every time I light up. (Which is ferociously often.)

So I did a candle-making workshop a few weeks back at the Workshop Makery and it was choice. Since then, I have realised that repurposing the countless old jars lying around TSE as candles would be a perfect avenue to avoid some inevitably wild christmas overconsumption. (Which still happened a bit by the way, but much less than in years past and thats all you can bloody hope for.)


Anyway these puppies are the result and here’s how to make them:

THINGS YOU WILL NEED (yep, candle stores exists, and you’ll probably need to go to one)

  • soy wax chips
  • fragrant essential oils
  • waxed string
  • wick holders
  • blutack
  • scales
  • thermometer
  • double boiler (ie saucepan boiling water on the stove with a steel bowl on top)
  • jug with good pouring spout.


  1. Assemble old jars, make sure they are clean and dry.
  2. Cut wicks from the string to match the containers, blutack with wick holders to the bottom of the jars (in the middle, obviously)
  3. Fire up double boiler, place bowl full of wax chips on top
  4. When wax has melted it will be about 80 degrees. Be careful. Duh.
  5. Tare jug on scales, transfer liquid wax to the scales.
  6. When wax has cooled to 65 degrees, add preferred oil (oil should make up about 10% of the total liquid, so if you've got 500g wax in the jug, add 55g of oil).
  7. Stir through and then fill up jars.
  8. As the wax sets (about half an hour) ensure the wick stays upright and not bending out to the walls of the jar, as otherwise the flame will make it explode when the candle eventually burns down that far.
  9. Soy wax is muy soft so cleaning up with boiling water is sweet as.

One two three and *poof* (lol) - you’re bob’s niece and/or nephew. It’s that easy!



Be as diligent as you can with weights and temperatures to make sure the texture is smooth and even the whole way down. Any less than 5% oil and you won’t smell anything, any more than 15% oil and it may ignite when you light the candle. Hopefully it goes without saying that you should try and avoid this at all costs. There is an endless amount of oils to choose from depending on your tastes or desired effect: my go-to is citronella, eucalyptus and musk, both to evoke smells of the Australian bush and also tell any mozzies around to stay the f away.

Candles can have a shocking effect on your countenance. At least it shocks me, that just by smelling stuff I can think and feel differently. I mean right?! I thought my brain was a bit firmer than that! Invigorating candles can perk you up and calming candles can put you to sleep… bananas.

Anyway candles are also really good for maintaining your circadian rhythm when the natural light of the day has diminished and you need your brain to register that sleepytime is approaching.

Really rols? Are you just going to keep writing paragraphs about the endless virtues of candles? F no I’m not. Candles need don't need me to do that, candles speak for themselves. Get stuck in!

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High Resolution

Default Attitude

Default Attitude