Hi.

I'm Roland, lucky human being and #everydaygreenie. 

I like to go on adventures, learn new things, take photos with my camera and make stuff with my hands. 
I get excited a lot.

Mainly I'm excited because I'm on a journey, to prove that sustainable living is not only important, but really achievable.

Find out more about this blog and why I'm on the internet here.

TASTY AF

TASTY AF

Consuming delicious food in the great outdoors is easily in my top five ‘most dependably excellent experiences’ I have ever encountered. Might even be the top. It definitely is while I'm doing it.

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While we’re talking food, anyone who reckons a vego diet can't be fulfilling definitely hasn't done it right. Take it from me - 26, 86kgs, appetite of a brontosaurus - eating a vegetarian diet can be entirely satiating.

Food preferences make up a large component of the ecological rucksack we all carry with us in modern living. What we eat and how we choose to consume food is heavily reflected in the environmental footprints our lifestyles leave behind, with those that preference red meat and factory farming significantly dwarfing vegetarian and subsistent alternatives.

We're just so fuggen disconnected from our food! Repetitive Rols strikes again, but what you eat is completely a matter for you! You don't need to subscribe completely to any dietary doctrine, just be mindful!!!

Teach yourself about the importance of your current diet for your future health, and the environmental impacts of different food groups. The information is right there for the learning, and consistently eating health-positive, low-impact food is not only achievable but will help you become more physiologically healthy beyond the nutrition chemistry; healthier mentally, physically and spiritually.

And away he goes. Come on, let’s to the point Rols.

Ok look, being able to cook has a lot to do with it. Cooking is easy once you get a grip on it, and an essential skill if you care about your health and the sustainability of your diet.

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I’m sure we can agree that cooking itself is great, but cooking outdoors is simply glorious, and cooking great food way outdoors is such a wonderful experience it’s almost unspeakable.

I don't need to tell you. You know, right? If you don't, I won't even bother trying to explain it, just go and do it, and take my iron-clad guarantee that you will have a great time. I’ll say again, consuming food in the great outdoors is easily in my top 3 (yep I upped it) ‘most dependably excellent experiences’ I have ever encountered.

For example, this vego camp curry we cooked recently up at Treach was TASTY AF

Recipe as follows (all provisions sourced from the ever-dependable Bulahdelah IGA)

Ingredients:

  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 brown onion
  • half a jar of curry paste (Ayam’s if possible)
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • assorted vegetables
  • bag of mixed leaves

Method:

Chop onions/garlic and fry, when see-through add curry paste and fry for 3-4 minutes before adding coconut milk and bringing to boil. Start chopping your veggies and when it starts bubbling begin adding to the pot. Cook for at least 10 minutes on low simmer, add chilli and condiments if van supplies permit. Organize various accoutrement, commence feeding. 

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This dinner exemplifies the simple appeal of camp cooking. It is very easy to make, very easy to scale up for more people by just adding vegetables, and very easy to adjust the consistency with liquid. And obviously sauce based food just continues tasting better and better in the days following should you end up with leftovers (such is my understanding, anyway; I don't often have leftovers).

I reckon once you start to get a grip on this style of vegetarian food it becomes such an automatic routine, which can then be applied to virtually any cuisine. Onions and garlic, flavours from whatever spice or paste you're using, liquid to the boil then add whatever veggies you're using in order of however long they take to cook.

In the one above, for example, we used mushrooms, beans, tomato and broccoli in that order. The longer you simmer for, the richer the sauce and more intense the flavours. Heap it on top of some rice, leaves, dip some bread in it, eat it with a soup spoon, you can't really go wrong. And sauces just get better and better in the days after cooking as the flavours consolidate and intensify - or so I understand, anyway (I rarely have leftovers).

I feel like cooking this way guarantees that your meal will be an immensely pleasurable experience regardless of how you eventually consume it, but if you want to turbo charge it add coriander, fresh avocado and cold beer.

Oh yeah, and be outside!

VEGO FOOD OATHHHHHH

VEGO FOOD OATHHHHHH

How long the bag lasts

How long the bag lasts

Dear Patagonia Pt 2

Dear Patagonia Pt 2